Tag Archives: Indigenous Knowledge

Leader Turned Laggard? Canada, the Nagoya Protocol, and the Road Ahead

As discussed elsewhere on this site, the Nagoya Protocol is a supplementary agreement to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), which came into force in 2014. Its stated purpose is to help achieve the third goal of the CBD, namely the “[f]air and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the use of genetic resources.”  Canada…
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Inuit and Federal Governments to Join Up to Protect Marine Biodiversity

The federal government and Inuit of Labrador recently came to an agreement called the ‘Imappivut’ (meaning ‘Our Waters’) initiative that incorporates Inuit Traditional Knowledge (TK) to develop a marine management plan for 380,000 square kilometers of the far east end of the Northwest passage. The zone will be split into two areas, one which extends…
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ABS and TK Governance Implications of Environmental Assessment Act Review

By Chidi Oguamanam, Andrea Lesperance, and Chris Koziol In June 2016, the Government of Canada launched a comprehensive review of federal environmental and regulatory processes, including a review of federal environmental assessment processes under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012. One stated reason for this review was that to better include the voices and perspectives…
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Implications of Digital DNA on the Nagoya Protocol

“Biopiracy” refers to the phenomena whereby plants and animals are physically removed from Indigenous communities, without their knowledge or consent, in order to extract and manipulate genetic material from those plants or animals. This is typically done to commercialize some characteristic of the plant or animal that has marketable properties. For example, the anti-freeze proteins…
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