Monthly Archives: June 2016

Backgrounder: Canada and International Biodiversity Law

The Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit-sharing (ABS) entered into force on 12 October 2014 and is of relevance to many bio-based sectors like agriculture, botanicals, cosmetics, food and beverage, industrial biotechnology, and pharmaceuticals. Greater legal certainty and transparency can help providers and users of genetic resources (GR) and associated traditional knowledge (ATK) by creating…
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Regulating marine genetic resources in areas beyond national jurisdiction

Marine genetic resources are likely to be useful for the development of new drugs, compounds, for use in food and industrial process, among others. For both pharmaceutical companies and researchers, this offers an opportunity to engage in marine bioprospecting, by searching for new genes and biomolecules of plants and animals located in oceans. Despite the…
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How turmeric lattes signify the need to protect traditional knowledge on an international level

Turmeric lattes are gaining international popularity but they also symbolize the threat faced by traditional knowledge with commercial exploitation. The Guardian reported that cafes and restaurants from across Sydney to San Francisco have introduced the drink - a combination of milk and ground haldi (turmeric), to their menu. Google singled out turmeric latte as a…
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The importance of plant diversity in climate change adaptation: the unique role of ABS

Genetic resources offer a unique approach to climate change mitigation. In Canada, average temperatures over the last sixty years have increased by 1.5 degrees. As a whole, the climate has also become wetter based on trends indicating increased annual average precipitation.   This has impact on agriculture and food security. Plant genetic diversity can assist…
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